CAMP TSATANUGI

1925-1950

The council purchased a ninety-two or ninety-three acre tract near Cave Spring in Middle Valley on North Chickamauga Creek (now Hixson). The Boy 

 

Scouts named their new camp "Tsatanugi," using the same Cherokee word meaning "rock which comes to a point" from which historians believe Chattanooga’s name was derived. The name is preserved to this present day in Tsatanuga Road which leads to the old camp.  

 

Eventually, over 30 buildings were constructed at Camp Tsatanugi.  The three major buildings were Patten Hall, built in memory of John A. Patten; Rotary Hall, built by the Chattanooga Rotary Club; and the headquarters building, built by Hamilton County.  The John A. Patten Dining Hall bears an engraved stone set in the center above the hearth memorablising John Patten, which can still be seen to this day.  Most of the cabins were constructed by sponsors of various troops.

The Chattanooga Area Council (known by this name from 1925 to 1944) operated Camp Tsatanugi as a summer camp from 1925 to 1950, with the exception of 1945, when the council operated Camp Tso-Le-Tsu-Ke

There are three patches known to exist, all with the same design: one with a blue background, one with a gray background, and one saying "STAFF".  These are all felt patches.  A 1946 newspaper article reports that every Scout in camp during the first week of 1946 earned "a camp emblem" by advancing one rank in Scouting or, if a first-class Scout, by earning at least three merit badges.  This "camp emblem" may have been the felt patch.

 

In the 1920s and 1930s, Camp Tsatanugi also offered a "camp emblem" which could be paired with "loyalty wings" and stars.  Early documents and photographs from 1927-1931 indicate that a camp emblem was issued to Scouts who excelled at camping and advancement.  The emblem was the letter "C" circumscribing the letter "T".  No known examples exist, although several photographs of the emblem exist.


The property was sold in 1968 to the Highland Sportsman Club (located at 1028 Tsatanuga Trail), which it still remains to this day.

PHOTOS FROM CAMP TSATANUGI

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1938

1946

1948

Undated

Location
Sources

Camp Emblem

1926-03-18 - Campers Club - Tsatanugi Camp Emblem Mention

1926-03-27 - Meeting of Campers Club - Camp Emblems

1926-03-31 - Camp Emblem

1926-12-18 - AR Keith Awarded Camp Emblem with Loyalty Wings

1927-07-10 - Boy Scouts at Camp Tsatanugi - Camp Emblem Points

1928-07-08 - Camp Tsatanugi - Camp Emblem Awarded

1928-08-05 - Camp Tsatanugi Camp Emblem and Loyalty Wings

1928-08-13 - Mystery Camp Emblem

1929-03-10 - Star Scout Going to Peru - William Spears Loyalty Wings

1929-07-29 - Camp Emblem Award Winners

1930-07-21 - Ducktown Scouts Spend Week at Camp Tsatanugi - Camp Emblem Winners

1933-01-01 - Harmon Smith Loyalty Wings

1933-08-06 - Win Scout Camp Emblems

1940-10-01 - Rossville Ga Camp Emblem Winners

1946-06-26 - Tsatanugi Scout Camp Has Capacity Crowds - Camp Emblem

1926

April 23, 1926 - The University Echo (reporting that fraternity Phi Beta Gamma had a houseparty at Camp Tsatanugi over Easter, including a program in front of the large open fireplace in Patten Hall)

June 25, 1926 - Shelbyville Scouts attend Camp Tstanugi

1927

1927-06-26 - Boy Scout Camp Will Open Monday

1928

April 20, 1928 - The University Echo (reporting that fraternity member Brother Crane spent Easter at Camp Tsatanugi where he looked after his little Boy Scouts) - possible reference to Norton Crane

1928-06-15 - Younger Boys Going to Camp Tsatanugi

1928-06-16 - Scouts to Learn How to Pioneer

1928-07-08 - Boy Scout Activities - Camp Tsatanugi

1929

March 15, 1929 - The University Echo (reporting that fraternity brothers Farmer, Diffendorfer, and Magill (probably Hugh Magill) "camped at the Boy Scout camp near Hixon Saturday and Sunday)

1930

According to Polk County News, in 1930 "Ducktown Scout Troop 14 spend a week at Camp Tsatanugi in Chattanooga. Loyalty wings were awarded to James Howell, Eugene Lanning, Leona Swanson and Eben Stephenson."

1932

In 1932, the council did not hold a regular camp, yet on average 30 boys were in some camp each night of the summer.  Troops and districts held their camps separately.

 

1932-08-30 - Scouts Ask Chest to Pay Insurance

1933

August 2, 1933 Tsatanugi Trail Camp Newsletter
August 6, 1933 Tsatanugi Trail Camp Newsletter

1934

1934-07-29 - Scouts and Leaders in Charge of Camp

1935

Map showing Camp Tsatanugi

1936

In 1936, Camp Tsatanugi was leased to the N.Y.A for 6 months as a SHE, SHE, SHE camp.  In return for the use of the property the government agreed to improve certain buildings on the property.

1937

1937 Camp Tsatanugi Fact Sheet

1941

1941-05-25 - Boy Scout Camps Will Open Next Month at Tsatanugi and Rolling Stone

1944

1944-05-04 - Signal Property To Be Scout Camp

1945

1945 Final Report of Charles Peacock

1946

1946-05-30 - Staff for Scout Camp Announced by Hubbuch (William Hubbuch, Frank Hinnant, Luther McEwen, Dan Keller, Byron White, Jack Cassel, Johnny Morgan, Pat Rungee, J.L. Roberts, Jim Abshire, Walter Frierson)

June 26, 1946 Article about Camp Tsatanugi - Plenty of Meat in Scout Camp, Editor Learns

1946-06-26 - Tsatanugi Scout Camp Has Capacity Crowds (Byron White, Frank Hinnant)

1947

Scout Camp Planned 31st
Tsatanugi Scout Camp Opens June 15

Staffers Relax

After the Hike is Over
A Bulls-Eye

Can't Get 'Em Up

1950

1950-04-23 - Cherokee Is Chosen as Scout Camp Name

1960s

1960s - Improvement of Camp Tsatanugi
Electrical Blueprints for Patten Hall
Cover Letter for Electrical Blueprints
Bill of Material - Wiring for Patten Hall
Map to Camp Tsatanugi

1966

March 1966 Report on Council Properties

2006

Harmon Jolley, Historic Highway - Boy Scout Road