CAMP ROLLING STONE

1938-1945

Another camp operated by the Chattanooga/Cherokee Area Council during much of the same time as Camp Tsatanugi was Camp Rolling Stone.   It was a high adventure camp for Senior Scouts that operated its first summer in 1938 and operated at least through 1945.  The Council leased the 15.2-acre property annually from the U.S. Forest Service.   It was located in the Cherokee National Forest, 12 miles south of Tellico Plains (likely on Joe Brown Highway).  

 

To reach the camp, Scouts would drive on Route 68 through Tellico Plains.  10 miles south of Tellico, drivers took the left fork toward Hiwassee Dam and drive two miles.  The camp entrance was on the right of the highway.

 

The site had served as a Civilian Conservation Corps camp, #1454, during President Roosevelt’s New Deal and included a headquarters building, a two-room lodge, five cabins, a garage, and even a concrete swimming pool.  One source indicates that remnants of these buildings still exist.  "[The camp is] in a remote corner of the Hiwassee District near the North Carolina border and the Unicoi Turnpike. Enough remains on the ground at this former camp to determine the arrangement. A camp swimming pool was fashioned by widening a part of the creek that ran through the camp. Extant are the steps to the barracks, chimneys to administrative buildings and mess hall, remains of the latrine, and the camp's protected water source, a spring with a dry-laid stone hood."

An organized camp was only held for one week each summer (usually the week before Tsatanugi began), and was a base for expeditions into the forest and along the Appalachian Trail.  The requirements to attend were that a Scout must be 15 years old and at least First Class rank.

Scouts who devoted at least 50 hours of service to the camp were called "Beavers."  In 1940 & 1941, Scouts had an opportunity count their time toward Rolling Stone insignia.  One source explained that "Rolling Stone insignia may be worn by any Scouter or Scout with a total of seven days of camping. Designation as a beaver may be added to the insignia of any camper who completes 50 hours of service towards camp improvement."  Another source said a trip to Rolling Stone presented an opportunity to "work on camp improvement for credit on Rolling Stone Beaver emblem."


No memorabilia has surfaced connecting a beaver with the Rolling Stone insignia.

 

There are two types of Rolling Stone patches known to exist.  They both share the same design, except some do not depict the axe and shovel on either side of the fire.  The significance of the axe and sheovel are unknown.

HISTORY OF THE CCC CAMP

Prior to serving as a Boy Scout camp, Rolling Stone was a Civilian Conservation Corps ("CCC") camp.  The following information has been collected regarding the CCC camp.

  • "Another type of CCC resource is the abandoned site of a former camp, like Camp Rolling Stone, in a remote corner of the Hiwassee District near the North Carolina border and the Unicoi Turnpike. Enough remains on the ground at this former camp to determine the arrangement. A camp swimming pool was fashioned by widening a part of the creek that ran through the camp. Extant are the steps to the barracks, chimneys to administrative buildings and mess hall, remains of the latrine, and the camp's protected water source, a spring with a dry-laid stone hood."

  • CCC Camp near Coker Creek   CCC (Civilian Conservation Corp) Camp Rolling Stone #1454 on Joe Brown Highway In 1933 Franklin D Roosevelt and the democratic party searching for an end to rampant unemployment and economic chaos initiated the Civilian Conservation Corps. He planned a fight against soil erosion and declining timber resources by utilizing the unemployed of large urban areas. President Roosevelt revitalized the faith of the nation with several measures, one of which was the Emergency Conservation Work Act, more commonly known as the Civiliam Conservation Corps. With this action he brought together two wasted resources, (1) the unemployed young men of America and (2) the land, in an effort to save both.  Each member had to send home $25.00 of his $30.00/ month salary. These men lived in tents and in some areas of the country, built dormitory cabins which evolved into temporary little towns. At one time almost 600,000 men worked in the CCC called “Roosevelt’s Tree Army.” Camp Rolling Stone still has a few remnants of what once kept many American families from incredible suffering.    

  • Located just off the Unicoi Trail, the Civilian Conservation Corps established a camp here in the early 1930s called Camp Rolling Stone #1451 which employed young men in the era of depression.  Near the old camp is the site of the first tollgate in America.  A toll was charged for the passage of any "person or thing."  "For every man and horse, twelve and one-half cents; for every lead horse not in a drove, six and one-fourth cents."  - To Trailhead go 1.9 miles on Joe Brown Highway (CR 618) to parking area on right.  

  • "During the troubled economic times of the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was established to employ young men in conservation projects. Young men were paid $30 per month, with $25 of that being mailed home to the young man's family. Tellico Plains joined the ranks of cities and towns welcoming the CCC. In 1933, the Tellico River Camp offices and mess halls were constructed at Cane Break on the Tellico River, set up to serve 200 employed men. Eight camps established near Tellico Plains were Camp Chickasaw, Camp Rolling Stone, Camp McKrosky, Camp Joe Brown, Camp Chief Jack Starrs, Camp 4494, Grassy Flats, and Turkey Creek. The Tellico Ranger Station, on Tellico River Road, is now located on the former site of Camp Chickasaw. The camps were used by men trimming miles of trails though the Cherokee National Forest, including 65 miles of truck trails, motorways, and four bridges. They also made many areas of the forest accessible to forest fire crews by creating 16 miles of foot trails."

Location
Sources

1938-07-24 - Camp Rolling Stone

1938-08-09 - Evangeline Older Scouts Will Make Camp in Mountains

1938-08-18 - Scout Council to Name Camp Rolling Stone

1938-08-19 - New Scout Camp to Be Opened Sunday

1938-08-21 - Dedication Today at New Camp Site

1938-08-22 - Camp Rolling Stone for Scouts is Dedicated

1938-11-06 - Rolling Stone Beavers

1938 Fact Sheet
1938 Camp Regulations

Usage Form

1939-03-13 - Camp Rolling Stone Beavers

1940-03-18 - Senior Scouts to Camp Rolling Stone

1940-03-24 - Three Day Camp at Camp Rolling Stone

1940-06-02 - Camp Rolling Stone

1940-10-07 - Camp Rolling Stone - Beavers

1941-05-25 - Boy Scout Camps Will Open Next Month at Tsatanugi and Rolling Stone

1943 Brochure for Camp Tsatanugi and Camp Rolling Stone

1944-05-04 - Signal Property To Be Scout Camp

1945 Final Report of Charles Peacock